Laid Off, Now What?

January 11, 2010

2010 is Going to Be My Year

Filed under: 2010 (1) January — Les O'Riley @ 10:00 am
Tags: , ,

Either that, or I’m going to go crazy!

Seriously though, I’m still committed to finding that perfect job that’s out there waiting for me, so stay tuned. I’m not going to quit looking until I die, and thankfully that hasn’t happened yet.

I thought I had it. I went on an interview and then a followup interview with the Oklahoma Small Business Development Center (OSBDC) for a position as a Business Analyst. Both interviews went well. After the second interview I created a spreadsheet for them with the information they provided, took a grammar test and did a few hypothetical case scenario assessments. However, on Saturday I received a rejection letter, 2 – 3 weeks after the final interview.

Oh well, I’m not giving up. I have also applied for a position with Southeastern Oklahoma State University as an Academic Advisor. We’ll see where that goes.

More to come, hopefully good news.

4 Comments »

  1. I feel a tinge of pain when I read this, some degree of empathy, knowing how hard and cold and tough and sometimes cruel the whole scene can be, and can imagine the struggles with rejection, self-esteem, all that sort of thing, the uncertainty that is caused, the potential confusion, the many questions (mostly unanswerable) that can be raised.
    I have to admit with some shame that I keep my ridiculous job because of fear of throwing myself back out there in the marketplace as a 53 year old man who has done almost all blue-collar work all these years and never made much money. The security of having something, even if it’s pathetic, has a grip on me, not so much because of the economic climate, though that is a factor, but because I have five dependents, and one in college. But the weirdest thing may be the fact that the poorer I remain, the better chance for my daughter, and other children, to receive grants and scholarships. So I either stay at my current income, or I need to make a whole lot more, I mean a whole lot, for it to be worthwhile for the family scene. So I remain a coward in a job that is often flat-out goofy with a supervisor who should have been fired many years ago but has ingratiated himself deeply with the 94 year old landlord. I’m such a coward that I even thought for a moment- what if he saw this somehow and showed the boss?

    Comment by cliff — February 25, 2010 @ 11:57 am | Reply

    • Cliff. Excuse me, sir… but you really need to quit beating on yourself. At the ripe young age of 53, (excellent age, same as yours truly,) you have secured at least one nugget of wisdom. You and I, both having lived in NYC and other metropolitan areas, have learned the art of “doing-what-needs-to-be-done.” You clearly have your priorities in order, first and foremost caring and providing for your family. In today’s less-than-economically-stable world, it’s not easy to make a smooth transition to a “much better paying” job. What you are doing now is not just steady and feeding, clothing and providing for the welfare of your family, it is also allowing your kids to avail themselves of resources that they couldn’t touch if you were in a higher income bracket. The grants, scholarships etc. that are available to your kids are made exactly for people like yourself: conscientious, hard working people doing the best they can with what they have at the moment to take care of numerous people under their care. Bravo, I say! Even unemployed, I have no qualms whatsoever with my tax dollars supporting such worthwhile a cause. Timing plays such a big roll in our multidimensional lives. We can have great plans, well thought out, with the desire to move in another direction, and timing throws a big wrench in the thick of it. Patience and determination then come into play all the more. A job paying twice what you currently make could take away all chances for your children’s grants, scholarships, etc. At the same time as all of this is going on, you have still managed to continue your own education, pursuing higher goals for yourself while keeping your children’s education and advancement as your top priority. Certainly you can see how fewer dollars in your pocket at the moment, for the overall good of your family is way more valuable than extra cash. There’s a lot to be said for maintaining stability. Especially when we’re talking about 6 people, not one. Although your decisions have been difficult ones, I see them as noble. You have good morals. Don’t slight yourself. Keep up the fight. You’re winning, even if at times you may not be sure. Selfishness or the greater good of all… you have chosen the greater good. As a friend of yours, I’m proud of you. Some of us who were formerly in better paying jobs are now in a different situation. I write this to you from the public library, in between sending out resumes. Hang in there, I’ll do the same. ~ Les

      Comment by Les — February 25, 2010 @ 1:12 pm | Reply

  2. Thanks, Barb. Shall do. I’ll keep crankin’ out resumes until I make that special connection. It’s great to hear that your hubby landed a new job. Congrats to him! Ask him to send a bit of his job-finding karma this way. Take care. ~ Les

    Comment by Les — January 21, 2010 @ 8:01 am | Reply

  3. Wow. They really made you jump through a bunch of hoops. I suppose a form letter is the way everyone is doing it these days, but it seems cold when so much of your heart is in the interview.

    Brace your shoulders and keep you head up. There’s something out there that’s preparing itself for you.

    Comment by Barb — January 21, 2010 @ 12:57 am | Reply


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